2015/11/19

Mentally troubled people

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I meant to write some hardware-focused posts these days, but those drafts look petty in the context of an avalanche of instinctive caveman reactions to the Paris attacks these days.

The Independent

This is unimportant to the stupid people, of course. In their opinion foreign terrorists would 'justify' bombing other countries, while domestic terrorists would 'justify' the suspension of religious freedom and ethnic cleansing fantasies. Either way, they're primitive.

NYT Editorial Slams “Disgraceful” CIA Exploitation of Paris Attacks, But Submissive Media Role Is Key
The Intercept

The reflexive exploitation of tragic events by the usual suspects for lobbying for normally unacceptable legal changes is very common, far beyond the errorism issue. Americans know this from school shootings, for example; the usually suspended gun control debate flares up after every such even for a few weeks.
I suppose such reflexive demands are not a mere failure of the news media that's a willing multiplier. The real causes are likely that we don't get problems solved without extraordinary pressure and don't decisively penalize dangerous idiots for being just that, rather allow them to return and return and return.
 
The Intercept

This was interesting in two ways; for one, it rejects some of the reflexive claims and accusations of the despicable pro-mass surveillance state crowd. Second, it reveals that yet again a large multi-target terror strike only succeeded because law enforcement and intelligence services have failed to make good use of a wealth of hints, as in 2001. These communities should be penalized for demanding more authority and less civil rights, and even more so they should be punished for failing on their job.
 

Meanwhile, Paul Krugman appears to have a faint hope that Hollande isn't just gone nuts, but maybe exploiting the increased freedom of action for macroeconomic good. I think Hollande went much farther than necessary for such a strategy.

By the way; where does the idea that panicking and demanding aggressive actions, discrimination against millions of people, bigger budgets, more intelligence service powers are signs of a 'strong leader' come from?
To me, this sounds like fearful chicken(hawk) behaviour. A 'strong leader' would laugh off the scratch and point out that a ridiculous rag tag militia and stupid immature boys cannot do more than itch a community of 800+ million Westerners. Daesh is the equivalent of a flea to us; its bite may be irritating, but ultimately it's utterly harmless to us as a group. Our real problems are larger by multiple orders of magnitude.
Politicians who freak out about errorists are the equivalent of a person jumping onto furniture to escape the terror of a common spider walking on the floor.

S O

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4 comments:

  1. We demand mil porn!

    We are the people and we know what we need! More gold plated stealth fighters, less common sense!

    The problem for the West is that the generation that remembers dictators is no longer dominant. The newer generations don't understand the danger of a police state. They trust the goverment too much.

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    Replies
    1. Frankly, the East Germans remember a dictatorship well at ages 40+. They're not exactly known to be stalwart defenders of democracy these days, though. Spain isn't either, nor is Turkey or Hungary.

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  2. Good point.

    So it isn't the memory.

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  3. Good point as Madner said.
    Muslim shooter = entire religion guilty.
    Muslims are the first victims of Islamic (T)errorism, if I can formulate it like that.
    More than 60 % of all Muslims live in Asia.
    They don’t speak Arabic and they are even less related to ISIS/Daesh.
    It is not about religion… those times are over and buried a long time ago.
    It is only a blatant racist reaction mixed with a natural self preserving instinct.
    That reaction might be a creation.

    Shia Muslim point of view was always discarded, as Iranian fed propaganda, even though it was the most objective and most correct at times, very often (IMHO).

    ‘Daesh is the equivalent of a flea to us; its bite may be irritating, but ultimately it's utterly harmless to us as a group.’ I share that point of view, as well as the whole content of your article. But, we are not always a group.
    I dissent when it comes to their (ISIS) supporters, because the situation is not clear enough.
    So, it has to be investigated.

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